Winners

by admin on May 28, 2010

Winners

Dr. Judd Biasiotto & Dr. Richard Williams

July 2010

The reason most people never reach their goals is that they don’t define them, learn about them, or even seriously consider them as believable or achievable. Winners can tell you where they are going, what they plan to do along the way, and who will

John Watley

Winners, leaders, masters, people with personal power, all take responsibility for their behavior. The buck stops with them. They function under the premise that they are in control of their own destiny, that they create their own world. Whatever happens, good or bad, they believe that they gave birth to the situation. They don’t believe that they are controlled by such things as fortune, destiny, karma, luck, chance, biorhythms, eugenics, heredity, environment, para-psychic

psychology, or any other condition that is beyond their control. In general, they are internalizes. They feel like they are in complete control and that they can shape their world. Consequently, they take full responsibility for their world. It is not coincidental that you will hear them say when things don’t go right, I am responsible I will take care of it, The buck stops here. In short, they believe they create their own reality and they are willing to take responsibility for that reality. Unfortunately, most Americans have a major problem taking responsibility for anything. In fact, the tendency to deny our shortcomings is the American way.

Have you ever read the book, A Country of Victims? If not, you should. It will give you a revealing insight into America’s inability to take responsibility for its own actions. The book arduously points out that Americans can not accept defeat or failure whether it’s in sports, politics, economics, education, or anything else for that matter. As a country and a people we are constantly pointing fingers at everyone else, but never really owning up to our own short comings.

Like our Lord said in the Bible, we tend to see the splinter in everyone else’s eye, but we fail to see the log in our own. Of course, if there is no one to point at when we do something wrong, we come up with 50-million excuses of why it wasn’t our fault. It is never our fault. Sadly, we are in a time in our world were few people want to be responsible for their actions.

I will give you a good example of what I am talking about. A few years ago I subcontracted with a small publishing company to do a number of brochures and pamphlets for me. It was a small company, but they had state-of-the-art equipment and they were blessed with talent. I looked at a lot of work produced by other companies, but their work was head and shoulders above everyone else. Naturally, I negotiated a contract with them.

The first job they did for me was four days late. When I addressed the issue with them they came up with some wonderful excuses that had nothing to do with their business; but, I figured what the heck, they did a good job, so I will just let it slide. The next job they did for me was a week late. This didn’t sit well because the work they were doing for me I needed to help one of my customers. Naturally, I got grief from my customer and deservedly so; consequently, I passed that grief on to them. I did it cordially, but sternly. Surprisingly, they got this little attitude with me — like I was working for them or something. Interestingly, there were two other customers there, whose work was not ready either, and they took on an attitude with the company, too. Besides their attitude, the company had some wonderful excuses. Still, their work was so good that I decided to give them one more chance. This time though, I showed them what I needed and asked them how long it would take them to do the job. They said that it would take two weeks maximum to complete the work. I said, “Okay, I will give you three weeks to get it done and then I will be back.

I know you are not going to believe this, but three weeks later they had not even started the job. When I asked them why, the owner was quick to respond. He said, “Look, if were a few days late, you are just going to have to deal with it. There are more important things in life then your brochures. I freaked out. Of course, there are more important things in life than my brochures, but I didn’t hire them to do those things. I hired them to do my brochures. The idea of a company is to provide a service and in so doing make life easier for the customer, not harder. Naturally, if a customer needs a service, he is going to be dependent upon the people who are going to provide that service. So those people darn well better provide that service and on time. And it would be nice to say, “Please and Thank you” now and then.

To be honest, I was very embarrassed because I let these people abuse and disrespect me and my customers, not once, not twice, but three times. Not only did they lose my business, but they also lost all the business of my customers, and the business I did for their customers. Think about it this way: You are only four people away from knowing everyone in the world because you know one person, who knows another person, who knows another person, and so on and so on. Well the word must have got around the world, because no more than six months later that business with state-of-the-art facilities and equipment, and more talent than you could shake a rug at, went right out of business. What a pity. Here was a company that could have easily evolved into a multi-million dollar corporation and now its members are all out collecting unemployment.

First of all those big dummies were not committed to what they were doing. Like Lou Holtz said, There is no abiding success without commitment. Successful people are willing to do whatever it takes to succeed. That as much as anything else is what separates them from the pack. Having talent is wonderful, but it is absolutely worthless unless you get off your butt and use it. If you look at successful people in any field, you will most likely find that they are not necessarily the best or the brightest, the fastest or the strongest. You will find that they are the ones who are the most committed to a purpose.

To pursue a purpose, without pause, is the true secret to success. One aim, without halt, no excuses, no apologies, no quitting, just total unremitting resolve in achieving your objective. It is the quality of commitment that separates to good from the great, little else. When you are committed to excellence, when you have an attitude that screams out NOTHING LESS THEN THE BEST, then you are on the road to greatness. The company I dealt with wasn’t determined to succeed. They weren’t committed to excellence, they were committed to failure.

Where they really screwed up, though, is that they terribly underestimated the power of people. Like I said before, people can make you or break you. They can bring you fame and fortune, or they can destroy you. People, not things, are your greatest resources, your greatest advertisement, and your greatest manifesto. People who are really successful in life almost universally have a tremendous sense of respect and appreciation for their fellow man. They understand that there is no long-lasting success without having a good rapport with others. That’s right…we need each other.

Author’s Note: Although this article was written in first person in order to make the text more entertaining, the writing of this article was truly a cooperative task which required essentially equal contributions from each of the authors. The order of authorship does not imply or indicate a primary contribution.

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